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Roses by Bobbink & Atkins
(1929)  Page(s) 63.  
 
Bourbon Roses
The Bourbons are desirable old-fashioned Roses closely related to the Chinas. Many of them bloom continuously but a few are once-blooming only. There are both climbing and bedding types. Our list includes two of the finest old sorts and interesting, modern varieties. 
Adam Messerich. (P. Lambert, 1920.) Clear rosy red, well-filled, fragrant flowers, freely borne singly or in threes on a bushy plant 3 to 6 feet high, with bright green, healthy foliage.
A good, continuously blooming massing or shrub Rose. $1 each.
(1929)  Page(s) 46.  
 
Hardy Climbing Roses
Adélaide Moullé. Hybrid Wichuraiana. (Barbier & Cie., 1902.) Moderately large flowers of lilac-pink with carmine centers, delicately suffused yellow; slightly fragrant. Cluster flowering; very vigorous.
Midseason. Profuse and very attractive, but not of any great distinction.
(1929)  Page(s) 11.  
 
Everblooming Roses
The so-called Everblooming Roses include the Hybrid Tea and Pernetiana groups. They do not bloom all the time, but if kept healthy and growing steadily, one crop of flowers succeeds another at brief intervals.
Admiral Ward. Hybrid Tea. (Pernet-Ducher, 1915.) Blackish buds, opening slowly to large, superbly formed blooms of good crimson-red; very fragrant. Grows moderately and blooms best in autumn.
Desirable in collections of beautiful Roses. It specializes in producing a fair quantity of excellent blooms rather than many indifferent ones.
(1929)  Page(s) 5.  
 
Recent Introductions and Rare Varieties
Admiration. Hybrid Tea. (S. McGredy & Son, 1922.) Pointed buds of salmon-rose, and large, high-centered blooms of cream-white, heavily shaded with light orange-vermilion. Fragrant and fairly free-flowering. A vigorous, healthy plant.
The color reminds one of the autumn shades of Gruss an Aachen, but in hot weather it is likely to be pretty pale.
(1929)  Page(s) 11.  
 
Everblooming Roses
The so-called Everblooming Roses include the Hybrid Tea and Pernetiana groups. They do not bloom all the time, but if kept healthy and growing steadily, one crop of flowers succeeds another at brief intervals.
Adonis. Hybrid Tea. (Bees Ltd., 1921.) Large, long buds, opening to massive blooms of ivory-cream, lightly shaded with lemon. Very double, with full, high centers, and fragrant. Grows compactly and flowers well throughout the season.
Most excellent for cutting and exhibition, being similar in color but larger and more impressive than the famous old Kaiserin Auguste Viktoria. Likely to ball in damp weather but all white Roses do that. $1.50 each.
(1929)  Page(s) 42.  
 
Polyantha Roses
Polyanthas are, perhaps the most truly everblooming of all Roses, being scarcely ever out of flower during the whole growing season... They are especially valuable for massing, edging, and to some extent for mingling with other flowers.
Ænnchen Müller. (J. C. Schmidt, 1907.) Shining, bright pink blooms of fairly large size, with sharply quilled petals, borne in splendid trusses. The strong, bushy plants, 2 feet high, are almost always in bloom.
A splendid Rose for massing and bordering which we consider one of the finest of the type. This and Chatillon Rose are the most brilliant pure pink Polyanthas, and, undoubtedly, the most prolific bloomers. Chatillon Rose is a shade or two lighter and has a tinge of salmon in the color, but Ænnchen’s flowers are more double and a trifle larger. Both are superb for summer color in the rose-garden.
(1929)  Page(s) 64.  Includes photo(s).
 
Shrub Roses
Agnes. (Saunders, 1922.) Coppery yellow buds and flowers which become pale amber-gold upon opening. They are well shaped for the Rugosa type, sweetly fragrant, and freely produced in early summer. Foliage grayish, much pitted and wrinkled. Growth moderate but hardy.
A new Rugosa from Canada, said to be a hybrid of Persian Yellow and R. rugosa alba. It is the first, and so far the only Rugosa which is really yellow and is therefore unique in its class. Recently it has been awarded a Gold Medal for the most distinct Rose of a new type originated in America. It is certainly worth serious trial. $2 each. See illustration on opposite page.
(1931)  Page(s) 60.  Includes photo(s).
 
‘Agnes’. A rose of the imperishable hardy Rugosa type – creamy gold in the bud and exquisite ivory-yellow when open. Its foliage is hoary green and very rough, and the plant is extra strong. This is a rose for difficult soils, for rough places and neglected corners which it will convert into spots of loveliness.
(1929)  Page(s) 11.  
 
Everblooming Roses
The so-called Everblooming Roses include the Hybrid Tea and Pernetiana groups. They do not bloom all the time, but if kept healthy and growing steadily, one crop of flowers succeeds another at brief intervals.
Aladdin. Hybrid Tea. (W. Paul & Son, 1917.) Medium-sized, globular buds of copper-yellow; open flowers almost single, rich orange-yellow paling as the flowers age; some fragrance. Strong, branching growth, blooming in diffuse clusters; resistant to disease.
An almost single Rose of undoubted merit for garden decoration. The flower is reminiscent of Harry Kirk, but smaller and more intensely yellow. Early bloom excellent, fine in autumn, but summer bloom not so good.
(1929)  Page(s) 46.  
 
Hardy Climbing Roses
Albéric Barbier. Hybrid Wichuraiana. (Barbier & Cie., 1900.) Creamy white, charming flowers with pale yellow centers; fragrant. Blooms in small sprays; extremely vigorous with waxy, holly-like foliage.
Early and often blooms in fall. Delicately beautiful but needs protection in severe climates. Its buds are perfection.
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