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StefanDC
most recent 13 JUN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 13 JUN by StefanDC
The hip photographed here doesn't look at all right for this type of rose; could it possibly be from something like R. canina rootstock instead?
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most recent 22 MAY SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 16 JUL 22 by viscount89
Extremely disease resistant here in Atlanta. It blooms really are a combination of both Dee-Lish and Lady Of Shallot. So far, it is an excellent cultivar.
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 12 MAY by StefanDC
I would love to know how this one is holding up for you in terms of disease resistance, and whether you have any opinions about the scent. I've hesitated to try it because both parents have proven to be highly prone to blackspot in my garden, and while the parents each have strong and beautiful fragrances to offer, it doesn't sound like this rose is especially fragrant.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 15 MAY by viscount89
It's fairly disease-resistant and only mildly fragrant. The color is nice, but it's extremely slow to repeat. I've had it for several years and it hasn't made much of an impression on me. Unless it improves over the summer, I will be re-homing it this fall.
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 22 MAY by StefanDC
Thanks, that's very helpful information! I won't go out of my way to try this one, although the photographed color is striking and the disease resistance sounds much better than I would have guessed. It must have benefited from one of those lucky genetic pairings that somehow allowed it to exceed both of its parents.
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most recent 22 MAY SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 21 JUL 11 by Fredrik
Well...my patience is beginning to run out. This May and June were not so rainy but still the flowers balled. Lots of promising buds but that is really all. Very vigorous though.
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 21 MAY by StefanDC
Did you give it more chances? If so, did it improve? In a probably warmer climate, balling has not been a problem with this rose, but I am curious about your further experience.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 21 MAY by Fredrik
Hi Stefan,

No, I gave it up. It needs much drier conditions than I have. I know DC is very humid in summer but also a lot warmer so it might work. Good luck! Best, Fredrik
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 22 MAY by StefanDC
Thank you; I'm sorry to hear that it never performed well for you! We have bouts of many different kinds of weather here in the spring before summer's heat and humidity dominate--wet, dry, hot, cold, humid, windy, and sometimes all of them in rapid succession--and luckily, none has yet proven to be a serious problem for this rose. However, I am interested in its breeding potential and curious about the limitations, whatever they may be.
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most recent 7 APR HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 7 APR by StefanDC
The current accepted name for this species is Rosa caesia Sm.

See:

powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:731918-1
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 7 APR by jedmar
We have Rosa caesia Sm as the current name of the species Rosa coriifolia Fries. Rosa coriifolia froebelii is the understock introduced by Froebel in 1890 (Laxa). Added a clarification.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 7 APR by StefanDC
Thanks, but shouldn't this actually be listed as a cultivar of R. caesia, then? If you check the link, you'll see that R. coriifolia var. froebelii is listed as synonym of Rosa caesia along with R. coriifolila. It should really be listed as such in the names section, along with a good clarification. The best name would seem to be Rosa caesia 'Froebelii'.

Stefan
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 7 APR by jedmar
Kew lists it as a heterotypic synonym, which means it is not exactly the same, but a variant. The names in our listings are based on the references. HMF is not a botanical site and we do not add new names without a reference. In any case, it is more important to keep the listing of the understock separate from the general species.
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