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Paul Barden
most recent 7 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 29 NOV 13 by Rosentrost
Are there several copies of this rose? Who has it? Is it still alive?
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 7 days ago by Paul Barden
It is still alive and in a few private collections. Possibly in 2025, Burlington Roses will have plants to offer.
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most recent 7 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 15 FEB by HMF Admin
HelpMeFind is proud to announce the naming of magnificent rose from breeder Paul Barden after HMF's co-founder Clara Thomson. We are eternally grateful to Paul for this honor. Clara would be over the moon!
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 15 FEB by Kim Rupert
Marvelous! What a wonderful tribute to her!
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 7 days ago by Paul Barden
I'm happy that I was able to make this well deserved tribute possible.
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most recent 8 APR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 12 MAR 03 by Unregistered Guest
Which roses make good parents?
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Reply #1 of 16 posted 12 MAR 03 by Unregistered Guest
[From Breeding Roses at Home, by Captain George C. Thomas, p. 23:] The pod-bearer must ripen seed readily, must transmit foreign qualities from the sire, and must confer a high percentage of germination. The father should transfer certain desired characteristics to the rose children, and this is possible in a greater degree than is understood.
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Reply #5 of 16 posted 20 JUL 05 by Unregistered Guest
When the parentage of roses is listed, which comes first? Is it pollen/seed or seed/pollen? Would appreciate learning this. Thank you.
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Reply #6 of 16 posted 21 JUL 05 by John Sheldon
The Seed Parent is always listed first followed by the Pollen Parent. So in a cross of Golden Age x Hollywood Star, Golden Age would be the seed parent that would produce the hip and Hollywood star would be the pollen parent.

In today's world of digital camera's I like to use a series of photos showing the blooms, foliage, and plants of each parent so I have an idea of what to expect from the offspring. The bloom comparison of the above cross would look like this:

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Reply #7 of 16 posted 28 JUL 05 by Unregistered Guest
Thank you very much. Really appreciate your taking the time to respond.
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Reply #8 of 16 posted 30 JUL 05 by John Sheldon
You're welcome. Here is a seedling that resulted from the cross of Golden Age by Hollywood Star. It's still a baby with a lot of maturing to do but you can already see it is off to a good start and not far off from either parent. Hince the saying, "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree"
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Reply #9 of 16 posted 1 AUG 05 by Stare
Thanks again, John. That is a nice-looking bloom.

My home is constructed of yellow/tan/dun/whatever brick. The apricots and oranges will, I believe, look best against my house. I've planted Westerland and Buff Beauty against the NE corner, and plan to put in climbers at the SE and SW corners next year.

I also hope to do some hybridizing. Got prepared to do that 6-7 yrs ago in the home I occupied w/my ex-wife, in Western Washington. Health problems intervened. SUrgery in early May has been life-changing, and so am returning to my obsession w/roses.

I really can't believe what a cool site/database this is. It obviously took a tremendous amount of time and effort to build it, and am sure maintaining it is difficult too.

Dave
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Reply #10 of 16 posted 2 AUG 05 by John Sheldon
We all owe the owners and developers of HMF a debt of gratitude. It has to be a tremendous financial burden on them to develop and maintain this site and yet, keep the site free to the public and not encumbered with pop-up ads. I hope if the time ever comes that they need financial support to keep it running, everyone who uses it will step up and help. Without a doubt it's my favorite rose site on the internet.
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Reply #11 of 16 posted 4 AUG 05 by Stare
I agree. Thanks again.

Dave
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Reply #13 of 16 posted 8 NOV 07 by Warren Millington
Big hello from australia

Looking at each parent does nt really give you an indication of what you will get in the end, I used a florabunda as the seed parent, for two different crosses, its seed parent was listed, but back to the 2nd generation , was listed unknown. With its pollen parent, also listed unkown.

I crossed this with Abraham Darby, giving me 13 different structures of good quality and colours , from whites with apricot, yellow and pink blends.

This florabunda was also crossed with altimissmo, giving me. 6 variations of structure from singles, semi doubles and doubles. The colours achieved were red , pink , yellow , bright pink yellow blend and bright pink white blend.


When I used Moulin rouge as the seed parent, most offspring were red, but the flower structure was of the pollenator.


So by lookin at what parents look like, does nt mean your going to get what you think .


cheers
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Reply #15 of 16 posted 7 APR by BatinelliGardens
I'm looking to try a little cross breeding project for fun does anyone here know weather or not any of these are fertile? I know GC produces hips. any info on fertile david Austin's would be fantastic so i can try this out

golden celebration
Eustacia vie
Gabriele oak
crown princess Margaretta
poets wife
Desdamona
elizebeth
Earth angel not a da but I do have this one
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Reply #2 of 16 posted 16 NOV 04 by John Sheldon
To answer your question first requires a knowledge of what your goal is. Are you trying to breed Hybrid Teas, Floribundas, Mini's, etc? From there I need to know what is most important about that type of rose that you are trying to improve, disease resistance, winter hardiness, heat tolerance etc.

HelpMeFind is developing some exciting new tools for anyone interested breeding roses that will allow you to enter a rose and see how many times it has been used as a seed parent or pollen parent or both. That will help you to determine how successful it has been in the past at producing offspring that have been registered. They are also developing the ability for you to enter any two roses you like and see if they have ever been crossed before and if so, what offspring they produced. By looking at the offspring you can get a general idea of the traits, that cross will pass on to their offspring.

If you just want to gain experience with handling and germinating seeds you might try picking hips that have already matured on bushes. That knowledge can be very helpful down the road when you have a valuable cross you have made.

The Rose Hybridizers Association also has information on Seed and Pollen parents that have been successful for their members.

Good seed parents for me have been Golden Age, Hopie Girl, Fragrant Cloud and Pristine.
Good pollen parents have been Hopie Girl, Golden Age, Lanvin and First Prize.

Good Luck and Have Fun!
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Reply #14 of 16 posted 7 APR by BatinelliGardens
I'm looking to try a little cross breeding project for fun does anyone here know weather or not any of these are fertile? I know GC produces hips. any info on fertile david Austin's would be fantastic so i can try this out

golden celebration
Eustacia vie
Gabriele oak
crown princess Margaretta
poets wife
Desdamona
elizebeth
Earth angel not a da but I do have this one
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Reply #16 of 16 posted 8 APR by Nastarana
Me being a Matthias Tantau, Jr. fangirl, it amazes me to see that 'Fragrant Cloud' is still being used by breeders.
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Reply #3 of 16 posted 24 NOV 04 by Paul Barden
It's part fact and part mythology about the fertility of Miniature Roses. Many of the earlier ones had only partial fertility, if any at all, but there are many modern Miniatures that are highly fertile as both seed and pollen parent. No matter what your goals, you would be well advised to choose seed parents from a list of proven breeders, some of which are listed below. This is by no means a complete list, but is a good starting point from which to proceed:

· 'Sequoia Gold': Best used as a seed parent, gives some pollen. Produces some very good compact plants with good coloring.
· 'Avandel': A softly colored rose in peach and off-white. This is a very reliable seed setter whose seeds germinate easily. (Shown at right)
· 'Softee': Another softly colored Miniature (light yellow) that has great potential as a parent. Sets seed easily.
· 'Little Chief': Best for pollen only. Ralph Moore tells me he regrets not using this rose more, as he believes that it has the ability to produce great things. It has parented some very good, tiny roses with excellent compact growth habits.
· 'Sheri Anne': Excellent seed parent, good pollen too. Many of the best Miniatures have this rose in their pedigree somewhere.
· 'Rise 'N' Shine': Either seed or pollen parent. Some of my nicest Miniature seedlings have come from 'Rise 'N' Shine'. It produces a lot of pale seedlings which you have to weed out though.
· 'Joycie': Excellent seed parent, good pollen also. A great rose to start a breeding program with! Highly recommended.
· 'Golden Angel': Best as seed parent, imprints pollen parent characteristics very readily. An older Miniature, but still an excellent choice for starting a good breeding program.
· 'Sequoia Ruby': Best as seed parent, produces broad color range in offspring. I have obtained some very interesting russet and gray-mauve seedlings from this variety!
· 'June Laver': Best as a seed parent, often producing richly colored offspring with excellent form.
· 'Loving Touch': Has produced some decent offspring for me, best as seed parent. My new Miniature 'Lindsay's Rose' came from a cross using 'Loving Touch' and an un-named miniature seedling. This variety has been used only sparingly in breeding programs, as it tends to give pale or white seedlings. Still, its progeny tend to have very good form and nice shrub shape.
· 'Fairy Moss': an old but useful parent rose. Gives good quantities of seed that germinates very easily, making this a great choice for beginners. Passes on mossy buds to a percentage of its offspring. This has been used very frequently in the production of the Modern Miniature Moss roses from Ralph Moore and other breeders. Works well as a pollen parent also.
. 'Peachy White'; (Illustrated at left) This has been used sparingly in breeding, but the late Harmon Saville used it way back before Ralph Moore gave it a name. Its offspring includes 'Sunday Brunch', 'Golden Angel', 'Rise 'N' Shine' on down to the the sixth generation hybrids like 'Glowing Amber'.
· 'Black Jade' and 'Jean Kenneally': Although I have not used either of these to any extent, a friend of mine tells me these are good seed setters and have produced some good offspring.

Through the history of breeding Miniatures, it has been discovered that a few Floribundas have been very useful as parents, for two major reasons. First, they help impart hybrid vigor to their offspring, and secondly, they produce seed in larger quantities than the Miniature seed parents, making it possible to make more rapid progress in the breeding program. With the exception of a few good Miniature seed varieties, most of the Miniatures produce only a few seeds per hip and often the germination is poor, thus slowing the rate of progress. Also, since miniaturism behaves (generally) as a dominant trait, then the choice of seed parent matters little as far as obtaining Miniature progeny is concerned. In most instances, the pollen from a Miniature when placed on any large shrub will result in a high percentage of Miniature offspring. This varies depending on the choice of seed parent, but this has been found to be true in general. In fact, in Ralph Moore's pioneer work with Miniatures, the seed parent was often a large Rambler descended from R. wichuraiana that produces canes up to 20 feet long! (See "0-47-19") 'Tiny Flame' from 1969, and 'Trinket' from 1965 are both crested using Miniature pollen on this Rambler parent, and yet both of them grow no taller then 10 inches tall!

'Little Darling' is one of the Floribundas that is in the background of many of the modern Miniatures and is still very much worth using. (Best used as a seed parent, but very capable as a pollen parent also) 'Little Darling', when pollinated with Miniatures pollen will produce many Miniature offspring. There are no fewer than 163 named varieties bred from 'Little Darling', the vast majority of which are Miniatures! Although this is an older variety, it is undoubtedly still well worth using as a parent in combination with some of the newer Miniatures. I suspect it is capable of creating great things if bred with some of the new Minis. These comments about 'Little Darling' apply to the Floribundas 'Gold Badge' and 'Orangeade' as well, both of which have played a significant role in the breeding of modern Miniatures.

Although there are very few truly good seed parent varieties, there are quite a few excellent pollen parents to choose from. Miniatures that have been frequently used as pollen parents include: 'Little Chief', 'Cherry Magic', 'Fire Princess', 'Little Buckaroo', 'Magic Wand', 'New Penny', 'Peachy White', 'Pinstripe', 'Sheri Anne', 'Make Believe' and 'Red Fairy'. Again, this is by no means an exhaustive list, but rather is a selection of PROVEN parents still worth exploring for their sterling virtues as breeders. Once you have had a year or two to experiment with the technique of pollination, seed harvest, stratification, germination and seedling care, you may want to branch out and experiment to find out which other Miniatures work as pollen parents. (Or seed parents, for that matter) There are many fine roses available that may turn out to be excellent parents, and it may be YOU who does the pioneer work with some undiscovered parent rose!

I would like to stress that if you wish to create some of your own hybrids, it is of the utmost importance to choose some of the proven breeders to work with, at least in the beginning, because there is nothing worse than ending up with mediocre results to create an impression of failure and disappointment. Choosing good parents will insure some degree of success, which will in turn, encourage you to continue with your work and learn more about the genetics of the plants you are working with. Many an amateur hybridizer has started out with only a couple of well chosen parent plants and ended up creating some of the world's most loved hybrids. I'm thinking of Dee Bennett's 'Irresistible', George Mander's magnificent 'Glowing Amber', and Sean McCann's amazing red Mini Climber, 'S.W.A.L.K.' You don't have to be very serious about growing a few of your own hybridsin order to benefit from choosing good parents. Even if your goal is just to have fun and please yourself, it is worth investing the time and energy to select breeders with a good track record. Although it is early in the year to be thinking about the coming season's hybridizing work, it is not too early to be planning which parents you wish to use, and to start acquiring those plants.
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Reply #12 of 16 posted 19 MAR 07 by HanfordRose
Hi Paul.

Sue Curry (formerly Sue O'Brien) here. This is a very nice response to the original question.

I thought that I might add just one other comment. My Mom (Dee Bennett) used a number of larger varieties, most notably the HT 'Futura', to create her minis. Mom discovered early on that pollen from minis would cause a hybrid yield of at least 95 percent mini or mini flora seedlings. She liked to make her crosses of mini pollen onto known show champion big roses. Her goal was to attain the form and/or color of the big rose in a miniature size. That is why so many of her minis became popular exhibition varieties, like the great 'Jean Kenneally' and 'Irresistible'.

Sadly, Mom used to throw away any seedlings that were larger than mini size. Minis were her goal; and I can only imagine how many great seedlings never got beyond her first evaluation of the plant. Toward the end of Mom's life, I was able to convince her to keep a few of those slightly larger seedings. Some of those are now in the mini flora and floribunda class.
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Reply #4 of 16 posted 20 FEB 05 by Anonymous-797
Try observing the roses in your garden to see which set hips without any help. I learned which were good parents by collecting and planting the self set seed. Those which germinated well were good parents. You can also find out that information by browsing Help Me Find. Breeding information is given where it is known, so you can see what roses made the ones you admire most.

You'll notice with any research, many breeders have favorites. They're the roses the breeder frequently uses. Look up the types of roses you like most and the individual ones you admire. You'll quickly develop a feel for what should work for you.
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most recent 26 MAR HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 26 MAR by Paul Barden
This is not Golden Buddha
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